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22 Lower Park Street

In 1978/79 Nos. 20, 21 and 22 were converted into one house and it is now known as 21 Lower Park Street

Records for the individual properties up until 1980 have been listed under No. 20, No. 21 and No. 22 respectively
See: JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/20; JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/21; and JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/22

Records for the current 21 Lower Park Street [New] See: JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/45

22 Tenison Avenue

Known as 'Ranmoor'

Leasehold sold by the estate of Charles Armstrong (deceased) to P. J. Durrant of Selwyn College on 11th April 1940

23 Jesus Lane [Star]

History of the Site 23 and 24 Jesus Lane

These houses stand on the site of one tenement known in early 16th century as the Pownde Candell or Pound of Candles (possibly an Inn or tallow chandler’s workshop). In 1478 the lease was held by William Warde; in 1533/5 by Mrs Huntley and in 1541/49 by Mr Chancellour. In 1585 Ralf Watson, a labourer, held the lease and it was unusual for a college lease to be to a working man. A covenant provided for occupation as a dwelling for a single family (suggesting it used to be an inn). Succeeding tenants were a wool spinster and then another labourer suggesting poor living accommodation.
In 1659 a widow and her son, William Watson (cordwainer) held the lease of the messuage which was described as a house, yard and garden plot with buildings, workshops and chambers.
1683 – Nicholas Smith (currier)
1730 – Thomas Gunton (gardener). At this time there were 4 cottages on the site.
1773 – Ann Gunton sold her interest to William Cowling (innkeeper). He turned the western most house into a Public House.
1780 – William Cowling sublet the public house, at that time known as the Wagon and Horses, to Joseph Butcher (brewer) and in 1793 he let it to Alderman Ind (brewer and founder of the firm Ind, Coope).
The Inn then changed its name to the Cradle and Coffin before being renamed in 1801 the Star. later it was known as the Coach and Horses.
Adjoining the inn was a house on the site of No. 24 and behind it were two cottages of only one room each. By the middle of the 19th century the Star was suffering from competition from other inns in the area and in 1864 Alderman John Death (who had made his money as a livery stable keeper) acquired the premises. He demolished the public house, the small house and the cottages and built the two houses No. 23 and 24. These were demolished in the 1970s and now part of West Court.

23 King Street and King's Court Estate [Demolished]

Demolished as part of King Street shops development. Includes the early records of 23 King Street.

In the 19th century numbers one and two King's Court and number 23 King Street are mostly found together and are catalogued as part of the same estate [King's Court estate]. King's Court was formerly known as Sweep's Yard. The records for number 23 King street from 1924 to 1942 are found with 19 King Street and 15b Malcolm Street [JCAD/3/CAM/KING/25].

From 1967 numbers one and two King's Court appear together with 19 King Street and 15b Malcolm Street and are catalogued together with those records [JCAD/3/CAM/KING/25]

Correspondence concerning the purchase of 23 King Street in 1967 is found with 10, 11 and 12 New Court [JCAD/3/CAM/NEW/1/3/1]

23 Lower Park Street

In 1971/72 Nos. 23 and 24 were converted into one house and it is now known as 24 Lower Park Street

Records for the individual properties up until 1972 have been listed under No. 23 and No. 24 respectively
See: JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/23 and JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/24

Records for the current 24 Lower Park Street [New] See: JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/46

23 Tenison Avenue

Known as 'Lynden'

Lease of 3 messuages and premises known as 'Cliveden' (No. 21), 'Lynden' (No. 23) and 'Marden' (No. 25) in Tenison Avenue for the term of 99 years from 25th March 1895 to Charles Armstrong

24 Jesus Lane

History of the Site 23 and 24 Jesus Lane

These houses stand on the site of one tenement known in early 16th century as the Pownde Candell or Pound of Candles (possibly an Inn or tallow chandler’s workshop). In 1478 the lease was held by William Warde; in 1533/5 by Mrs Huntley and in 1541/49 by Mr Chancellour. In 1585 Ralf Watson, a labourer, held the lease and it was unusual for a college lease to be to a working man. A covenant provided for occupation as a dwelling for a single family (suggesting it used to be an inn). Succeeding tenants were a wool spinster and then another labourer suggesting poor living accommodation.
In 1659 a widow and her son, William Watson (cordwainer) held the lease of the messuage which was described as a house, yard and garden plot with buildings, workshops and chambers.
1683 – Nicholas Smith (currier)
1730 – Thomas Gunton (gardener). At this time there were 4 cottages on the site.
1773 – Ann Gunton sold her interest to William Cowling (innkeeper). He turned the western most house into a public house.
1780 – William Cowling sublet the public house, at that time known as the Wagon and Horses, to Joseph Butcher (brewer) and in 1793 he let it to Alderman Ind (brewer and founder of the firm Ind, Coope).
The Inn then changed its name to the Cradle and Coffin before being renamed in 1801 the Star. later it was known as the Coach and Horses.
Adjoining the inn was a house on the site of No. 24 and behind it were two cottages of only one room each. By the middle of the 19th century the Star was suffering from competition from other inns in the area and in 1864 Alderman John Death (who had made his money as a livery stable keeper) acquired the premises. He demolished the public house, the small house and the cottages and built the two houses No. 23 and 24. These were demolished in the 1970s and now part of West Court.

24 Lower Park Street

In 1971/72 Nos. 23 and 24 were converted into one house and it is now known as 24 Lower Park Street

Records for the individual properties up until 1972 have been listed under No. 23 and No. 24 respectively
See: JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/23 and JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/24

Records for the current 24 Lower Park Street [New] See: JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/46

24 Lower Park Street [New]

In 1971/72 Nos. 23 and 24 were converted into one house and it is now known as 24 Lower Park Street

Records for the individual properties up until 1972 have been listed under No. 23 and No. 24 respectively
See: JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/23 and JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/24

Records for the current 24 Lower Park Street [New] See: JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/46

24 New Square, 1890

Letter from Hugh Shield (Bursar) to Mr J. Chater on behalf of the Executors of J. Barrett offering the executors a new lease for 40 years from 24 June 1890. Also a site plan showing the outline of the property including dimensions and the names of the neighbouring lessees.

24 New Square, 1900

Letter from Rowe & Scott (Architects) to J. H. H. Goodwin saying that No. 24 had recently been sold by Mr Verinder to Mr Christmas who wished to make a small addition to the house and build a tool house in the garden. They enclose a plan which had been submitted to and approved by the Local Authorities and asked for the College to approve the work.

The colour plan shows the elevation, plan of the sitting room and kitchen, section A-B for the addition to the house and the elevation, section and plan of the tool house.

24 Station Road

Letter from Hugh Shield (Bursar) to William Thomas Palmer offering him a new lease of Lorne Villa for 40 years from 25th March 1888 on payment of a fine of £95 18s 9d (to include all solicitor and surveyor's charges and all expenses). New rent to be set at £6 pa for the first 26 years and £13 15s for the last 14 years. Attached is a plan of the property showing the size of the premises and the names of the neighbouring leaseholders

Shield, Hugh

24 Tenison Avenue

Known as 'Heatherdene'

Leasehold sold by the estate of Charles Armstrong (deceased) to S. A. Rolfe of 56 Newmarket Road, Cambridge on 25th April 1940

25 Jesus Lane

History of 25 and 26 Jesus Lane

Lessees in the early 17th century included William Ogden (yeoman); Reuben Fitches (cook) and in 1660 William Watson (cordwainer). By 1707 John Dennis (cook) held the lease. The property consisted of 2 tenements with a garden and one new house which was occupied by William Randall (carpenter).
In 1790 William Cowling sold his lease to an innkeeper who kept the tenements as an investment. His widow lived in the front house which Cowling had rebuilt on the site of the two original houses. There was also a small house behind.

Eleanor Prior Sparrow took a lease of three tenements in Jesus Lane. They are not identified in the lease by house number but are described in the lease as having been held by the widow Cowling. Eleanor Sparrow died on 26th March 1843 and left all 3 tenements in a will to her daughter Sophia Harrenden who was married to an artist called Richard Banks Harrenden. In 1850 the three tenements were included in a marriage settlement made on the occasion of their daughter Catherine's marriage to Francis George Hodgson.

25 New Square, 1890

  • JCCA/JCAD/3/CAM/NEWSQ/25/3/1
  • Item
  • 1 February 1890 - 13 June 1890
  • Part of College Archives

Letter from Hugh Shield (Bursar) to Miss Smith offering her a new 40 year lease from 24 June 1890 and a subsequent letter dated 13 June 1890 offering a change to one of the terms of the lease. Also a site plan showing the outline of the property including dimensions and names of neighbouring lessees.

25 Tenison Avenue

Known as 'Marden'

Lease of 3 messuages and premises known as 'Cliveden' (No. 21), 'Lynden' (No. 23) and 'Marden' (No. 25) in Tenison Avenue for the term of 99 years from 25th March 1895 to Charles Armstrong

26 Jesus Lane

History of 25 and 26 Jesus Lane

Lessees in the early 17th century included William Ogden (yeoman); Reuben Fitches (cook) and in 1660 William Watson (cordwainer). By 1707 John Dennis (cook) held the lease. The property consisted of 2 tenements with a garden and one new house which was occupied by William Randall (carpenter).
In 1790 William Cowling sold his lease to an innkeeper who kept the tenements as an investment. His widow lived in the front house which Cowling had rebuilt on the site of the two original houses. There was also a small house behind.

Eleanor Prior Sparrow took a lease of three tenements in Jesus Lane. They are not identified in the lease by house number but are described in the lease as having been held by the widow Cowling. Eleanor Sparrow died on 26th March 1843 and left all 3 tenements in a will to her daughter Sophia Harrenden who was married to an artist called Richard Banks Harrenden. In 1850 the three tenements were included in a marriage settlement made on the occasion of their daughter Catherine's marriage to Francis George Hodgson.

26 Station Road

  • JCCA/JCAD/3/CAM/STA/26/3/1
  • Item
  • 29 December 1887 - 17 March 1888
  • Part of College Archives

  1. Letter from Hugh Shield (Bursar) to Alfred Southwell (solicitor for the executors of John William Slack, dated 29th December 1887, offering a new lease of Wallis Villa for 40 years from 25th March 1888 on payment of a fine of £127 3s 9d (to include all solicitor and surveyor's charges and all expenses). New rent to be set at £7 pa for the first 26 years and £18 15s for the last 14 years

  2. Letter from Alfred Southwell, dated 23rd January 1888, accepting the terms of the new lease

  3. Letter from Alfred Southwell to Francis, Francis & Parker, dated 17th March 1888, making arrangements to sign the lease

  4. Draft abstract of the will of John William Slack, 1888

26 Station Road

  • JCCA/JCAD/3/CAM/STA/26/3/2
  • Item
  • 30 April 1902 - 21 May 1902
  • Part of College Archives

  1. Letter from J. H. H. Goodwin (Bursar), dated 30th April 1902, offering a new lease of Wallis Villa for 40 years from 25th March 1902 on payment of a fine of £127 3s 9d (to include all solicitor and surveyor's charges and all expenses). New rent to be set at £7 pa for the first 12 years and £18 15s for the last 28 years

  2. Letter from Southwell & Dennis (Solicitors), dated 21st May 1902, accepting the terms of the new lease

  3. A plan of the property marking out its size

27 Jesus Lane [Demolished]

Nos. 27-32 were bought by the Wesleyan Methodist Conference in 1922 to become a new Methodist College known as Wesley House. Nos. 27-30 were demolished in 1924

27 Lower Park Street

In 1972 Nos. 27 and 28 were converted into one house and it is now known as 28 Lower Park Street

Records for the individual properties up until 1972 have been listed under No. 27 and No. 28 respectively
See: JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/27 and JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/28

Records for the current 28 Lower Park Street [New] See: JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/47

28 Lower Park Street

In 1972 Nos. 27 and 28 were converted into one house and it is now known as 28 Lower Park Street

Records for the individual properties up until 1972 have been listed under No. 27 and No. 28 respectively
See: JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/27 and JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/28

Records for the current 28 Lower Park Street [New] See: JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/47

28 Lower Park Street [New]

In 1972 Nos. 27 and 28 were converted into one house and it is now known as 28 Lower Park Street

Records for the individual properties up until 1972 have been listed under No. 27 and No. 28 respectively
See: JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/27 and JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/28

Records for the current 28 Lower Park Street [New] See: JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/47

28 New Square, 1890

Letter from Lizzie Turner saying that she is enclosing a letter from the Bursar offering a new 40 year lease and she accepts the terms of the letter. She asks that the new lease be drawn up in her name and that of Frederick H. Sanderson who is her co-executor.

28 New Square, 1943-1944

  • JCCA/JCAD/3/CAM/NEWSQ/28/3/2
  • File
  • 6 September 1943 - 9 February 1944
  • Part of College Archives

Letters from J. Carter Jonas & Sons to the Bursar advising him that the back wing of the property, that had been built "40 or 50 years ago" was in a dangerous condition. They said they had written to the tenant Mr Suttle to inform him and urged the College to remove the back wing as it was causing the back wall of the house to move and would soon collapse. They had obtained an estimate from Messrs Coulson, builders, but said that the shoring materials that were needed were unobtainable and so advised them to demolish the wing and then consider rebuilding it.

29 Lower Park Street

In 1981 Nos. 29 and 30 were converted into one house and it is now known as 30 Lower Park Street

Records for the individual properties up to 1981 have been listed under No. 29 and No. 30 respectively
See: JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/29 and JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/30

Records for the current 30 Lower Park Street [New] See: JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/48

29 New Square, 1890

Letter from Hugh Shield (Bursar) offering [Mr Robert Barrett] a new lease for Nos. 29 and 30 from 29 September 1890. Also a site plan showing the outline of the properties including dimensions and naming Mrs Emma Wetenhall as the lessee of No. 31.

29 Tenison Avenue

Known as 'Elmley'

Leased to Charles Armstrong along with Ranmoorhurst [No. 5] and Normanhurst [No. 7] for 99 years from 25th March 1895

Leasehold sold by the estate of Charles Armstrong (deceased) to A. F. Free of 32 Cherryhinton Road, Cambridge on 8th April 1940

Results 301 to 350 of 22458