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2019

Includes copy of poster, submissions poster and programme

2020

Includes copy of poster, programme, captions from exhibition, photograph of organising committee and letters to members of the committee.

Photograph shows Astrid Godfrey, Sorcha Keenan, Rose Asquith, Alice Buckley, Alex Vardill, James Tybulewicz, Mojola Akinyemi, Olivia Emily, Alex Hadyn-Williams.

2020s

2019-2020
Music list and list of services for Michaelmas Term, 2019
Music list and list of services for Lent Term 2020

2020-2021
List of services for Michaelmas Term 2020
List of services for Easter Term 2021

2021-2022
Music list and list of services for Michaelmas Term 2021
Music list and list of services for Lent Term 2022
Music list for Easter Term 2022

2022-2023
List of services for Michaelmas 2022
Music list and list of services for Lent Term 2023
Music list and list of services for Easter Term 2023

2023-2024
Music list and list of services for Michaelmas Term 2023
Music list and list of services for Lent Term 2024

'20th Century Man'

Comprises audio recordings for a series of four television programmes made for KPBS TV (San Diego).

21 Lower Park Street

In 1978/79 Nos. 20, 21 and 22 were converted into one house and it is now known as 21 Lower Park Street

Records for the individual properties up until 1980 have been listed under No. 20, No. 21 and No. 22 respectively
See: JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/20; JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/21; and JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/22

Records for the current 21 Lower Park Street [New] See: JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/45

21 Lower Park Street [New]

In 1978/79 Nos. 20, 21 and 22 were converted into one house and it is now known as 21 Lower Park Street

Records for the individual properties up until 1980 have been listed under No. 20, No 21 or No. 22 respectively
See: JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/20; JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/21; and JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/22

Records for the current 21 Lower Park Street [New] See: JCAD/3/CAM/PARK/45

21 Tenison Avenue

Known as 'Cliveden'

Leased to Charles Armstrong for 99 years from 25th March 1895 along with 'Lynden' [No. 23] and 'Marden' [No. 25]

Leasehold sold by the estate of Charles Armstrong (deceased) to P. J. Durrant of Selwyn College on 11th April 1940

"21st Anniversary of Science & Human Values"

  • JCPP/Bronowski/Bronowski/3/8/3/11
  • File
  • 26 April 1973-11 May 1973
  • Part of Personal Papers

Consists of correspondence on Bronowski not being able to address the Technology and Culture Seminar at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) as part of a series on 'The Images of Man', and on a possible joint MIT and Salk Institute symposium to celebrate the 21st anniversary of 'Science and Human Values' [talks given at MIT by Bronowski] in Autumn 1973.

22 Jesus Lane

The History of 19 - 22 Jesus Lane

In 1443 this site was leased for 80 years to Edmund Lavenham. At the time there was a garden with no buildings except a thatched barn.

In 1502 the College leased it to Peter Cayle for 99 years. The sites of the houses on the street frontage were not included in the lease. Cayle’s children died and the land came back to the College.

In 1539 the site was in the hands of Lambton Luke (joiner) but by 1540/1 it was taken on a 40 year lease by Knolles (or Knoles).

In 1548/9 Knoles assigned his lease to another.

By 1553 there was a large house on the site known as Knowles’ Tenement and the site was acquired by Alderman Thomas Kymbold to whom the College granted a new lease for the joint lives of himself and his wife Margery. The ‘Mansion House’ fronted the street and still had the thatched barn behind.

In 1595 when his parents had died a new lease was granted to Thomas Kymbold the younger.

In 1609 it was renewed to his widow Grace Baker, who was living there with her second husband.

In 1634 a new lease was granted to Reuben Fitches (cook). In 1649 Bryan Kitchingham (gentleman), who had bought the freehold house next door from Mrs Baker, bought the lease of Knowles’ tenement and came to live in the 'Mansion House'.

He pulled down the house on the freehold site and laid out a garden and orchard and built a malting house partly on his ground and partly on College land (without the College realising possibly due to the upheavals of the Commonwealth).

He bequeathed his freehold land to his son Robert (clergyman) who sold it to Alexander Parker.

The College leasehold was bought by Anthony Digby (clothier) who also bought the freehold portion of the site from Parker’s widow a few years later.

In 1698 Anthony Digby, who had built a small house on his freehold site, sold his leasehold interest to John Harwood (woollen draper).

The lease was renewed in 1712 and by the next renewal in 1727 the big house had been divided into three. The property was acquired by Elizabeth Cawthorne who allowed the premises to become much decayed before she applied to renew the lease in 1769. In addition there were 5 stables and a chaise house (the former malt house).

In 1796 John Haggerston (tenant of the Manor House) had acquired the lease. One of the houses had become a public house called the Air Balloon (the name commemorating the experiment performed by one of its Fellows, Edward Daniel Clarke).

The stables had been converted into a malting occupied by Haggerston himself.

Shortly after this Haggerston alienated his lease to Richard Foster (brewer) under whose care the malting increased in value.

The public house was now known as the Hare and Hounds and was let to an undertenant.

Not until 1860s that any rebuilding took place.

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